Tag Archives: Tahrir

Blockade Busters – Activists and Ships Attempting to Break the Israeli Blockade of Gaza

 

By Ann Wright (about the author)

http://www.opednews.com/articles/Blockade-Busters–Activi-by-Ann-Wright-120823-585.html

After two years of continuous demands to the Israeli government and pressure on the Greek government for assistance, in mid-June, 2012, Greek activists succeeded in getting released from Israel two ships that had sailed in the 2010 Gaza Freedom Flotilla.

Sfendoni

The passenger ship “Sfendoni” and the cargo ship “Eleftheri Mesogeios,” or “Sofia” had to

be towed out of the Haifa, Israel harbor due to damage caused by Israeli commandos and intelligence agents when they attacked the ships on May 31, 2010. The “Sofia” was towed to Turkey and the “Sfendoni” was towed to the Greek port of Piraeus arriving on June 20, 2012. See here.Israeli commandos attacked all six ships in the flotilla and murdered nine persons on the Turkish ship Mavi Marmara and wounded 50 more passengers. Activists on each of the six ships were beaten up, tased, put in Israeli prison and eventually deported from Israel.

One year after Greece stopped Freedom Flotilla

The struggle to end Gaza blockade continues

http://canadiandimension.com/articles/4849/

DAVID HEAP AND EHAB LOTAYEF | July 27th 2012 |

The five delegates on the Tahrir who were apprehended in international waters and jailed in an Israeli prison

One year after the Greek government bowed to pressure and enforced he outsourced Israeli blockade of Gaza, the international movement to challenge the blockade is still very much afloat: we may change our tactics, but not our objectives. Our new campaign to challenge the blockade from the inside out emphasizes the fundamental importance of freedom of movement for Palestinians.

On July 4, 2011, the Canadian boat Tahrir left the port of Aghios Nikolaos (in Crete, Greece) bound for Gaza. After days of waiting for official clearance in the face of increasing bureaucratic and political obstacles, we decided to defy a Greek government ban on Freedom Flotilla departures and simply cast off. There were more than 40 people on board the Tahrir: a wide range of delegates from Australia, Belgium, Denmark and Canada as well as journalists from various countries. Our Greek captain and crew had been replaced for the occasion by volunteers — we were lucky to have among us delegates with professional maritime experience, from engineer to ship’s officers.

Gaza’s Ark floats hope one year after Greece stopped Freedom Flotilla 2

 

http://guests.blogactiv.eu/2012/07/27/gaza%E2%80%99s-ark-floats-hope-one-year-after-greece-stopped-freedom-flotilla-2/#comment-14550

By David Heap and Ehab Lotayef. 

David & Ehab return to Canada after being released from Israeli prison

One year after the Greek government bowed to pressure and enforced he outsourced Israeli blockade of Gaza, the international movement to challenge the blockade is still very much afloat: we may change our tactics, but not our objectives. Our new campaign to challenge the blockade from the inside out emphasizes the fundamental importance of freedom of movement for Palestinians.

On July 4, 2011 the Canadian boat Tahrir left the port of Aghios Nikolaos (in Crete, Greece) bound for Gaza. After days of waiting for official clearance in the face of increasing bureaucratic and political obstacles, we decided to defy a Greek government ban on Freedom Flotilla departures and simply cast off. There were more than 40 people on board the Tahrir: a wide range of delegates from Australia, Belgium, Denmark and Canada as well as journalists from various countries. Our Greek captain and crew had been replaced for the occasion by volunteers– we were lucky to have among us delegates with professional maritime experience, from engineer to ship’s officers.

One year after Greece stopped Freedom Flotilla: The struggle to end Gaza blockade continues

 

BY  DAVID HEAP EHAB LOTAYEF
JULY 26, 2012

Greek authorities forcibly prevented the Tahrir from sailing to Gaza last July

 One year after the Greek government bowed to pressure and enforced he outsourced Israeli blockade of Gaza, the international movement to challenge the blockade is still very much afloat: we may change our tactics, but not our objectives. Our new campaign to challenge the blockade from the inside out emphasizes the fundamental importance of freedom of movement for Palestinians.

On July 4, 2011 the Canadian boat Tahrir left the port of Aghios Nikolaos (in Crete, Greece) bound for Gaza. After days of waiting for official clearance in the face of increasing bureaucratic and political obstacles, we decided to defy a Greek government ban on Freedom Flotilla departures and simply cast off. There were more than 40 people on board the Tahrir: a wide range of delegates from Australia, Belgium, Denmark and Canada as well as journalists from various countries. Our Greek captain and crew had been replaced for the occasion by volunteers — we were lucky to have among us delegates with professional maritime experience, from engineer to ship’s officers.

New campaign challenges blockade a year after Greece blocked flotilla to Gaza

 

by David Heap and Ehab Lotayef on July 26, 2012

http://mondoweiss.net/2012/07/new-campaign-challenges-blockade-a-year-after-greece-blocked-flotilla-to-gaza.html

Fisherman from Gaza risking Israeli attack return to port, 2011. (Photo: Furlong/Getty Images)

One year after the Greek government bowed to pressure and enforced the outsourced Israeli blockade of Gaza, the international movement to challenge the blockade is still very much afloat: we may change our tactics, but not our objectives. Our new campaign to challenge the blockade from the inside out emphasizes the fundamental importance of freedom of movement for Palestinians.

On July 4, 2011 the Canadian boat Tahrir left the port of Aghios Nikolaos (in Crete, Greece) bound for Gaza. After days of waiting for official clearance in the face of increasing bureaucratic and political obstacles, we decided to defy a Greek government ban on Freedom Flotilla departures and simply cast off. There were more than 40 people on board the Tahrir: a wide range of delegates from Australia, Belgium, Denmark and Canada as well as journalists from various countries. Our Greek captain and crew had been replaced for the occasion by volunteers– we were lucky to have among us delegates with professional maritime experience, from engineers to ship’s officers.